Stephen King’s “It” Pennywise Design – part III

Now, it was time to go for the clothing.

I have been recently using Marvelous Designer for clothes and physical simulations, so here are some screens of it in action. I’m no expert in it, so don’t expect to see perfect seams and parts.
I bought a clown costume from TurboSquid to serve as a starting point, to help with the design.

I also exported the model to Mixamo for rigging and then went to pose it in 3ds Max.

pennywise_marvelous.jpg

Marvelous Designer screens, showing both poses

After some tests, it became clear I needed to make a full realised illustration.

pennywise_clothes1

At first I thought only about making the character in a pose, with no detailed background

So I put him in a sewer and changed the lighting to make it more dramatic.

The pose was a reference to my old drawing, updated to show the character calling you closer, but also at the beginning of a walk towards its prey. I also later added a skull and a paper boat to the background.

pennywise_3dsmax2

I used 3ds Max, ZBrush and Photoshop for the models, textures and editing

 

Anúncios

Stephen King’s “It” Pennywise Design – part II

Continuing the design process, I wanted to go 3D for the final image since the beginning.

So, at this point, it was time to go to ZBrush and work on a bust.
My idea was to make a full body figure, but the bust and face are key points in character design. So, if I could get it right, I was in the right track.

I used an Adobe Fuse model for the base mesh and did a quick render and some paintovers in Photoshop.

I decide to try the “shiny silver eyes” and evil grinning versions described in the book just to see how it looked.

pennywise_busto1_1

Number 18, exploring how the design would translate to 3D

pennywise_busto1_2

Number 19, showing a yellow tie – I changed its color to better fit within the color scheme

After these tests and being more advanced in the book, it became clear to me that the second version (number 18 of the previous post) was better suited for the final concept.

I then went and worked a bit on the face, giving it more expression and unique features.

pennywise_busto2_1

I decided to make the hair shorter to be less comical and unrealistic

This third version had me happier with the result. I tried the blue eyes described in its first appearance in the book, as well as the predatory yellow ones, also shown in both films (new and old). I also made the eyes a bit off, again inspired by the new Pennywise version (because it looks creepier too).

I then went to ZBrush and made some refinements in the face.

pennywise_zbrush1

First refinement. I wanted more expression

pennywise_zbrush2

Final version, having a good balance between expression and creepiness

Having decided for a final one, I went back to the paintover and updated it, as well as the evil grim version.

pennywise_bust_final1

Final concept

pennywise_bust_final2

Final evil concept

Now, it was time to go for the clothes and the illustration.

(continues)

Stephen King’s “It” Pennywise Design – part I

-THIS POST MAY CONTAIN SOME SPOILERS FROM THE BOOK-

 

“A figure was standing in those tangled weeds and low bushes, almost out of sight. It held a clutch of balloons – red, yellow, blue, green – in one white-gloved hand. It beckoned with the other. He couldn’t see the figure’s face, but he could see the baggy suit with the big orange pompom-buttons down the front and the floppy yellow bow-tie. It was a clown.”
King, Stephen. IT (pp. 223-224)

 

Hi everyone,

Inspired by the new film “IT” and the book, I decide to make my own version of Pennywise, using the original material as a guiding point.

The new Pennywise is a master piece. They got so many things right. So, with a little bit of the new version as an inspiration too, I started my other version, many years after my first one.

I acquired the book in Brazil back in 2000-2002. I used to make many drawings with colored pencils and my trusty Pentel mechanical pencil.

livro_acoisa

The 2000s edition I have, the one I read, showing its age. I love this cover

I did read the book at the time, but only a quarter of it. It was too big, and too scary. But Pennywise stuck with me, and I did some images of it at the time, one of which is below.

pennywise_antigo

His blue bow tie is taken from his first description in the book

Now, 15 years later, I wanted to make a new interpretation of him, this time using 3D and new tools I’ve learned.

I then started rereading the book, making my reinterpretation as I went along.

Based on the book I got the following guidelines:

-Looks like a cross between Ronald McDonald, Bozo and Clarabell;
-He wears a baggy, white-silver suit;
-He has two tufts of hair on each side of its bald head;
-Wears white makeup on the face;
-White gloves in the hands;
-Has large orange pompom-buttons in the front of the suit;
-Has blood red makeup on its face, making a clown smile;
-Wears funny, oversized shoes;
-Has sometimes yellow, predatory eyes, sometimes sliver shiny, like a coin, sometimes blue, inviting;
-Had to be a mix between a predator and a funny clown;

Before I started with the design, I gathered as much references as I could.
As the story takes place in the USA, I studied a bit of clown history in that country as well as England’s. The entity is very old, so many of my refs are from vintage, early 1900s clowns. Some references are also from the time the story first takes place, the 1950s and 1960s. I also searched for old toys and furniture.

Here is an image of most of my references packed together:

pennywise_mikael_refs

So I started with the basic, lines and base colors, as I went reading.

pennywise_concepts_all1.jpg

The first concepts, trying to give it some variation

When he first shows up, here is its first description (all quotes in this post are from the Kindle version):

“It was a clown, like in the circus or on TV. In fact he looked like a cross between Bozo and Clarabell, who talked by honking his (or was it her? – George was never really sure of the gender) horn on Howdy Doody Saturday mornings – Buffalo Bob was just about the only one who could understand Clarabell, and that always cracked George up. The face of the clown in the stormdrain was white, there were funny tufts of red hair on either side of his bald head, and there was a big clown-smile painted over his mouth. If George had been inhabiting a later year, he would have surely thought of Ronald McDonald before Bozo or Clarabell. The clown held a bunch of balloons, all colors, like gorgeous ripe fruit in one hand.”
(p. 15)
“How, George wondered, could I have thought his eyes were yellow? They were a bright, dancing blue, the color of his mom’s eyes, and Bill’s.”
(p. 16)
“He was wearing a baggy silk suit with great big orange buttons. A bright tie, electric-blue, flopped down his front, and on his hands were big white gloves, like the kind Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck always wore.”
(p. 16)

 

So I went using blue along the designs, both as a nod to the blue tie and eyes. Later it became clear to me that blue was not right, because his suit was actually silver and white:

“The figure was dressed in what appeared to be a white-silver clown suit.”
(p. 254)
“And there was the clown in the background, wearing his silver suit with the orange buttons(…)”
(pp. 878-879)

 

The real clown references were a big concern of mine.
Bozo, Clarabell and Ronald McDonald.

“(…)a clown which had looked like a cross between Ronald McDonald and Bozo, according to Hagarty.”
(p. 602)

Bozo had his big, curved hair, interesting gloves and white shape on its neck. Clarabell had its weird makeup and nice, vintage folds in its neck too. Ronald had its baggy suit and stripes.

 

As for the makeup, some guides:

“He was just like Ben and Bill said. Silver suit, orange buttons, white make-up on his face, big red smile. I don’t know if it was lipstick or make-up, but it looked like blood.”
(p. 858)
“The funny fellow had a huge grin on his face. He wore no make-up (except to Bill his whole face looked like make-up), but he was bald except for two tufts of hair that stuck up like horns over his ears, and Bill had no trouble recognizing their clown.”
(p. 876)

The second group of concepts explores these new points:

pennywise_concepts_all2.jpg

Here I tried to narrow the choices, mixing details and shapes between options

I decide to stick with the bow tie, since it was interesting in the overall design.
But I was still in doubt with the blue.

To me it seemed that numbers 18 and 19 were worth taking to the next step, as they brought the best of what I tought was in the book.

(continues)

 

Flintlock Firearms

Here are some concepts for my portfolio exploring guns and presentation.

I did a good amount of research and came to know there is a lot behind every gun, both historically and functionally. Loved and learned a lot during the process.

GD_firearms_blunderbuss_final

Flintlock Blunderbuss – the gold color is to make it distinct from the other weapons. I was also inspired by 1920s Tommy Guns for the reloader upgrade

GD_firearms_pistol_final

Flintlock Pistol – I wanted a stylish, almost mechanical design

GD_firearms_musket_final

Flintlock Musket – for the musket, I wanted to balance power and range, so I made the barrel  thicker

GD_Firearms_portifasnovo

I also did more variations to show different designs and mechanisms

GD_Firearms_makingof

A bit of my process: first I start with the silhouettes, after that I go for the line work and then to the 3D model

 

Conscious Mind – Worker Enemy

I am free to show some concepts I did for the upcoming “Conscious Mind” horror game from Moonville Entertainment.

Here is the process behind the concept of one of the enemies, the worker. It had to look like a human factory worker from behind but with a twisted face in the front.

worker_final_all

Final approved concept

worker1

First I started with the face, going wild with the designs. The client liked numbers 2, 4 and 6

worker2

Based on the previous ones the client liked, I did more versions. Number 7 was approved

worker3

I then went for the body and clothes, trying some variation

worker4

The client liked the overalls and vests, so I did more versions

worker5

Deciding on the overalls, I did more iterations. The final chosen one is number 11

Iemanjá/Yemoja

iemanja_final

Hi everyone,

Here is a new work I did.
This is Iemanjá/Yemoja, one of the main orishas of the afro-brazilian and yoruba religions. I wanted to show a different version of her, inspired by the shapes and powers of the sea. I did this image for the wonderful “Contos de Òrun Àiyé”, a comic book project by Hugo Canuto. More details about it here (portuguese only).

iemanja_makingof_01

I did a good research, learning some important aspects of her: she is a mother, queen of the sea, sometimes called and depicted as a mermaid. Symbols: the waning moon, starfish, waves, pearls.

iemanja_makingof_02

I ended up with the mermaid version, since in my opinion it was more primal and symbolic and had a good balance between power and beauty with a unique shape and silhouette.

iemanja_makingof_03

The final design is made to enhance the mother characteristics: big belly and breasts, the body paint of the womb (she gave birth to almost all deities). You can see my exploration and final design of the fan/mirror.

And here is a little making of.